Christmas Bird Count (Lethbridge)
Dec
16
6:30 AM06:30

Christmas Bird Count (Lethbridge)

Are you interested in participating?

This year Lethbridge Christmas Bird Count will take place on December 16.

More information can be found on the Audubon or Bird Studies Canada websites or you can contact the Lethbridge CBC Compiler Ken Orich at korich@telusplanet.net or call him at (403) 381-2351.

Please note, other Bird Counts in Southern Alberta:

  • Waterton - December 15, 2018 - Contact: Dianne Pachal 403-859-5133

  • Crowsnest Pass - January 2, 2019, contact Merilyn Liddell, birds@crowsnestconservation.ca

  • Milk River - January 5, 2019 - contact: Ken Orich 403-381-2351

  • Taber - TBD - contact Lloyd Bennett 403-223-0456 

  • Pincher Creek - TBD

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"Living Places, Living Time: What I learned in 13 lunar cycles of Blackfoot Phenology"
Nov
14
7:00 PM19:00

"Living Places, Living Time: What I learned in 13 lunar cycles of Blackfoot Phenology"

Join Nathan Binnema as he shares photos and observations of seasonal changes during each lunar cycle through the year from his site in the Edmonton River Valley. This presentation will provide a better understanding of the lunar calendar, the relative synchronicity of the living world, and how we can better live with the land. 

Speaker Bio:

Nathan Binnema grew up, studied, and currently lives and works in Edmonton.  As a child, he enjoyed many camping and hiking holidays to the Rocky Mountains, as well as walks in Kennedale Ravine and other parts of Edmonton's river valley.  With a Bachelor of Science degree with Specialization in Math from the University of Alberta, Nathan worked lawn maintenance to put himself through school.  Now working for a permaculture landscaping company called Spruce Permaculture, Nathan spends a considerable amount of time working outdoors on projects that align much better with his values.  Living carless in a 200 square foot suite in Edmonton, Nathan had the resources to pursue further learning after graduating in 2015.  He had always wanted to learn more about ecology, and when Ryan Heavy Head's Blackfoot Phenology course was being offered on an online platform, it was a once in a lifetime opportunity that could not be passed up.

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Amphibians and Reptiles of Southern Alberta
Oct
24
7:00 PM19:00

Amphibians and Reptiles of Southern Alberta

Join Kris Kendell, biologist with Alberta Conservation Association, for an informative presentation about the amphibian and reptilian life of southern Alberta. During the presentation you will increase your knowledge of the many unique adaptations and life histories of these fascinating creatures, and what you can do to help conserve them.

Speaker Bio:
For over 20 years, Kris has been dedicated to citizen science, habitat stewardship, inventory, monitoring, translocation and outreach initiatives that relate to amphibians and reptiles. As a longtime naturalist, he feels fortunate to turn something he’s passionate about into a career. In his free time, Kris is particularly interested in creating aquarium biotopes as an aquarium hobbyist, and aspires to expand into fish breeding for conservation to help save some of the most threatened fish species before they sink into extinction.

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Alberta Wilderness Association presents: Our Public Lands - A Treasure to Protect, film screening and discussion
Oct
10
7:00 PM19:00

Alberta Wilderness Association presents: Our Public Lands - A Treasure to Protect, film screening and discussion

Our Public Lands - October 10 2018 event poster

Our Public Lands series takes viewers on a journey through the diverse public lands of Alberta. With the help of recognized Albertan public lands experts, the series examines the history of public lands, the challenges they face today, and our responsibility to maintain them into the future.

Public lands are often considered one of the best ideas the west ever had: land that you and I can enjoy that is a wild and undeveloped, provides a safe haven for wildlife, ensures secure landscape for headwaters, and much more. Public lands make up the majority of land that is not privately owned – about 60% of Alberta. This includes parks and protected areas, Alberta’s forests and mountains, and a large portion of the grasslands and foothills of southern Alberta. 

Join us on Wednesday October 10 for a film discussion and screening with Nick Pink of the Alberta Wilderness Association. Bring a friend! Please consider making a donation to the Alberta Wilderness Association in order to help them with their mission! 

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Annual General Meeting 2018
Oct
10
6:45 PM18:45

Annual General Meeting 2018

The Board of Directors of the Lethbridge Naturalists' Society invite you to join us for our Annual General Meeting of Members to be held on Wednesday October 10, 2018 starting at 6:45 PM. The meeting will be held at the Helen Schuler Nature Centre community room, located in the Lethbridge river valley at the north end of Indian Battle Road South.

LNS ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING AGENDA

October 10, 2018 at 6:45pm at Helen Schuler Nature Centre Community Room

1. Call to Order

2. Approval of the Agenda

3. Minutes of Last Annual General Meeting

4. Business Arising from the Minutes

a. No business arising

5. Reports of Officers:

a. President’s Report

b. Treasurer’s Report

c. Nature Alberta Report

6. New Business

a. Appointment of Auditors 2018-19

b. Election of Officers 2018-19 Chair- Salina Perry

i. President

ii. Treasurer

iii. Vice-President

iv. Directors at large (3)

v. Recording Secretary

vi. Newsletter Editor

7. Announcements:

8. Next regular meeting: October 24th at 7pm at HSNC Community Room, regular meetings to take place on Second Wednesday of the month at 7pm in Community Room at Helen Schuler Nature Centre (HSNC). Full listing of events/meetings available at www.NatureLethbridge.ca/events

9. Adjournment

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Lethbridge Naturalists' Society Potluck
Sep
9
5:00 PM17:00

Lethbridge Naturalists' Society Potluck

The LNS potluck picnic is held annually, usually the second Sunday of September commencing at 5:00 pm! 

The picnic will be at Popson Park and the gate to picnic facility will be open Sunday September 9 shortly before 5:00 pm.

We will have boiled water so people can make coffee or tea. People are invited to bring a casserole, salad or dessert to share with everyone; people are also instructed to bring their own plates and cutlery.

We enjoy a social meal together, them usually go for a short hike along the edge of the river before sundown.

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"Wings over Canada" with Ian Wilson & Jacinthe Lavoie
Jun
13
7:00 PM19:00

"Wings over Canada" with Ian Wilson & Jacinthe Lavoie

Join authors and photographers Ian Wilson and Jacinthe Lavoie as they share their “travelogue with wings” and explore Canada one bird at a time, from shorebirds to songbirds, and raptors to waterfowl.

This colourful 45-minute presentation is a mix of vivid images and entertaining stories ... from watching the intricate mating ritual of cranes, to cedar waxwings feeding a nest of young birds, and pelicans diving for fish.  

After the presentation Ian and Jacinthe welcome questions about photography and the birds they have met along the way.

Speaker Bios:

  • Ian Wilson
    • Ian Wilson has spent many years exploring and photographing northern Canada. His photographs have appeared in many books and magazine across the country. His most recent books are Waterton Wild, Wildflowers of Banff Park, and Wildflowers of Waterton Park.
    • Ian has also written five bestselling outdoor adventure books. He is now pursuing his passion of photographing nature, and sharing his knowledge with others at photography workshops in Waterton and Banff Parks.
    • When he’s not wandering in the mountains, Ian lives in Canmore, Alberta.
  • Jacinthe Lavoie
    • Jacinthe Lavoie has been interested in wild creatures since her childhood. With training as a researcher, she has observed and enjoyed nature through each season. Her most recent books are Waterton Wild, Wildflowers of Banff Park, and Wildflowers of Waterton Park.
    • Jacinthe has also written twelve educational books. She is now fulfilling her dream of learning more about the outdoor world, and sharing her knowledge with others at nature workshops in Waterton and Banff Parks.
    • During the seasons when snow blankets the ground, Jacinthe lives in Canmore, Alberta.

Ian and Jacinthe are authors of three books that feature the wildlife, wildflowers, and scenery of Banff and Waterton Parks:

Find out more about Ian and Jacinthe at their website: http://wildflowersofbanff.com/ 

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Coulee Clean-Up at Cottonwood Park
May
24
7:00 PM19:00

Coulee Clean-Up at Cottonwood Park

Join members of the Lethbridge Naturalists' Society for a drop-in Coulee Clean-Up at Cottonwood Park! Help us remove garbage and debris from this natural area while we scramble through one of Lethbridge's nicest parks.

This is a great opportunity to connect with other naturalists, explore a beautiful park, and enjoy the wildflowers and wildlife sightings! Cottonwood Park is already well-maintained with little garbage so this will be more of a leisurely stroll with intent.

Wear sturdy footwear, dress for the weather, bring a water bottle, and bring a friend! Meet at the parking lot for supplies (bags and gloves) and orientation at 7pm on Thursday May 24 at 7pm. Hope to see everyone there! 

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Ecosystem Management Presentations (Part 2 of 2)
Apr
11
7:00 PM19:00

Ecosystem Management Presentations (Part 2 of 2)

Students from the Lethbridge College Ecosystem Management class will be presenting on the following topics:

  1. "A GIS-based HSI Model for Beaver (Castor canadensis) in the Castle Parks" by Emma Larocque
    • Abstract:

      Research continues to demonstrate that beaver can be an effectual and low cost tool for restoration and mitigation. However, there needs to be a better understanding of beaver habitat and occupation within Alberta before beaver can be used as an effective tool. The purpose of this research project was to create a Habitat Suitability Index to improve our understanding of potential beaver habitat within the Castle parks.

    • Biography:

      Emma LaRocque grew up on a ranch just outside of Waterton Lakes National Park and continues to spend most of her free time there. Watching the interactions between the land, livestock, and wildlife cultivated a deep appreciation for the natural world and a thirst for knowledge. Following her graduation from the Ecosystem Management degree program at Lethbridge College, Emma is looking forward to working with the Nature Conservancy of Canada as the Southern Foothills Natural Area Manager.

  2. "Comparing Sightability of Pronghorns Using Ground-Based and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Surveys" by Loren Seitz
    • Abstract

      Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have become increasingly useful for wildlife research. UAVs are useful tools that are cost-effective, efficient, safe, and allow access to areas that are difficult to reach by foot or vehicle. UAVs have been used to observe large terrestrial mammals, aquatic wildlife, and birds. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an UAV for pronghorn surveys within southeastern Alberta using a DJI Inspire 1 quadcopter in conjunction with a Zenmuse Z3 zoom camera. The study compares sightability of pronghorn populations using ground-based and UAV-based surveys while expanding upon existing knowledge on the effectiveness of UAVs for wildlife surveys.

    • Biography:

      I was born in Medicine Hat, Alberta where I developed a passion for nature and wildlife under the influence of my parents. I have been working with Alberta Environment and Parks with the Aquatic Invasive Species Program for the past three summers. During my time at school, I have developed a passion for drones and have been fascinated with their endless applications for wildlife research. I will be graduating this spring and I plan on doing some travelling before I begin my master’s degree. My goal is to apply my passion for wildlife and drones to a research project that will expand current knowledge on the use of drones for wildlife research applications.

  3. "Factors Influencing the Geographic Shift in Location of Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) Lekking Grounds." by Vincent Capuano
    • Abstract

      As habitat loss and fragmentation are growing concerns within the native prairie grassland, information regarding its impact on local species is beneficial to the conservation of these species, such as sharp-tailed grouse. Five sharp-tailed grouse lek sites within, and seven leks outside of, the Twin River Heritage Rangeland Natural Area, located west of Warner, Alberta, were assessed using on site survey data, supplemented with annual survey data provided by Alberta Environment & Parks.  Leks were located utilizing historical GPS coordinates provided by Alberta Environment & Parks, as well as auditory and visual cues. Once located, a count of active birds at each site was recorded and compared to that of the Alberta Environment & Parks datasets. With an average of ~10 more birds attending leks within the natural area, and the overall populations of these leks remaining fairly stable, it can be concluded that the Twin River Heritage Rangeland Natural Area offers better habitat selection for sharp-tail populations than the increasingly cultivated surrounding areas. The objective of this study is to help determine population trends of sharp-tail grouse lekking habitat on protected land verses habitat located on an unprotected landscape. In determining these trends, it may lead to the conservation of important sharp-tailed grouse lekking habitat that may not currently be protected; as well as, provide beneficial information regarding sharp-tail grouse population trends within these habitats.

    • Biography

      Growing up in the mountains of British Columbia, Vince spent most of his childhood hiking, fishing, and exploring the outdoors. Having an interest in wildlife from a very young age, Vince has always wanted work with different animals. Completing his degree in ecosystem management is one step closer to fulfilling his dream of becoming a wildlife biologist and studying unique wildlife from around the world.

Everyone is welcome to attend LNS events!  Donations are gratefully accepted to support the Society's ongoing activities.  Please share this event with friends who may be interested in learning more about ecosystem management.

Cover photo by Ken Orich. 

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Ecosystem Management Presentations (Part 1 of 2)
Mar
14
7:00 PM19:00

Ecosystem Management Presentations (Part 1 of 2)

Students from the Lethbridge College Ecosystem Management class will be presenting on the following topics:

  1. "Does Differing Riparian Vegetation in Two Southern Alberta Ponds Influence the Development Rate of Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) Tadpoles?" by Andre Brazeau
    • Abstract: Northern Leopard Frogs are a Species at Risk, and, although many studies have been done about what may affect tadpole development, there has been little research done on how vegetation may affect tadpole development. Dense riparian vegetation can cast shadows over the surface of water, lowering the overall temperature of the water body. This project attempts to determine if riparian vegetation density influences the development rates of Northern Leopard Frog tadpoles.
    • Speaker Bio: I was born in Medicine Hat, Alberta and spent the majority of my life there. I’ve always enjoyed the outdoors and it was this passion that influenced my decision to take the Renewable Resource Management diploma from Lethbridge College. Once the college came out with the Ecosystem Management degree program, it was a no brainer to continue my education there. My goal after school is to gain more experience towards my goal of becoming a Species at Risk biologist.
       
  2. "Resource Selection Function for the Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris) in Southern AB" by Brook Skagen
    • Abstract: The Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris) is one of 42 conservation priority species within Canada’s Prairie and Northern Bird Conservation Region. The species has experienced a cumulative population decline of 71% throughout North America since the 1960s, the mechanisms of which are not yet fully understood. With the increasing use of statistical models in wildlife habitat conservation efforts, resource selection functions (RSFs) have become an effective tool in modelling habitat associations of avian species. RSFs may be used to characterize the distribution and diversity of species across landscapes, as well as provide valuable insight into the habitat selection process of an organism. The objectives of the study were to develop a RSF model for the Horned Lark using data acquired within the Milk River drainage basin, so as to predict areas of key breeding habitat in southern Alberta. These findings may assist conservation initiatives in establishing an appropriate scope for habitat management objectives within the province.
    • Speaker Bio: Brook Skagen is an avid birder, writer, and nature enthusiast from the town of Redcliff, AB. She has contributed to various conservation projects through her involvement with Nature Alberta, Bird Studies Canada, Alberta Parks, and the Alberta Conservation Association. Through countless hours spent traversing the badland coulees, prairie fields, mixed-wood forests and mountain ridges of southern Alberta, she has developed a sense of passion and awe for the natural world. Upon her graduation, Brook hopes to find a career that will allow her to utilize her passion and knowledge for bird conservation.
       
  3. "Pilot study: The Reproductive Success and Habitat Home Range of the Grey Partridge (Perdix perdix) in Southern Alberta." by Jalen Hulit
    • Abstract:The Grey Partridge (Perdix perdix) is a small light grey upland game bird with a dark brown breast patch. They were introduced to North America from Europe during the early 20th century. For this project Grey Partridge were captured in January and radio necklace collars were attached. These collars were used to track movements of the birds, throughout the spring and summer. The objective of the project was to use the collected data to understand the preferred habitat of Grey Partridge during different life stages, along with nest success, clutch size and chick survival.
    • Speaker Bio: I am currently attending my fourth and final year of college at Lethbridge, where I am enrolled in the ecosystem management degree. I grew up on a farm 30 miles east of Coutts, Alberta on the Montana border. By growing up here I gained an appreciation for how everything in the ecosystem is connected and how it needs to be taken care of to run a successful farm. The past 2 summers I have been working at Alberta Conservation Association as a seasonal technician on the upland gamebird program. In the future I hope to be a Wildlife Biologist that works along side farmers and ranchers to better improve the native species that are found on their properties, while continuing to run their operation the way they always have.

Everyone is welcome to attend LNS events!  Donations are gratefully accepted to support the Society's ongoing activities.  Please share this event with friends who may be interested in learning more about ecosystem management

Cover photo by Ken Orich.

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Plants at Alberta's Springs: Who's there and why?
Feb
21
7:00 PM19:00

Plants at Alberta's Springs: Who's there and why?

Join Kayleigh Nielson as we explore non-native plant occurrence and human disturbance at freshwater springs in Alberta! 

Abstract (description): Freshwater springs in southern Alberta form resource-rich ecosystems that support highly biodiverse plant communities. The plant communities found at these springs often include both native and non-native species. Because of the risks associated with the invasion of non-native plants, understanding the factors that affect the occurrence of these species is important in order to protect biodiversity at these springs. In this talk, we will explore which plant species are commonly found at springs in southern Alberta, as well as some of the environmental factors that may promote the growth and establishment both native and non-native plants within these ecosystems.

Bio: Kayleigh Nielson, M.Sc. (’18) is a research associate at the University of Lethbridge in the Alberta Water and Environmental Science Building’s riparian ecology lab. She completed her B.Sc. (Hons) in Biological Sciences at the University of Lethbridge in 2014, having worked on several independent research projects, including an Honours Thesis on plant physiology and oil spills. Kayleigh successfully defended her Masters research in December 2017, which investigated the effects of human disturbance and the physical environment on non-native plant occurrence at springs in southern Alberta. In addition to her research interests, Kayleigh is an avid naturalist and outdoorsperson who enjoys sharing her knowledge about Lethbridge’s local ecology through her work and volunteerism, especially through the Helen Schuler Nature Centre.

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Wildlife of the Oldman River Valley - documentary screening
Jan
18
7:00 PM19:00

Wildlife of the Oldman River Valley - documentary screening

Due to popular demand we are proud to host a second screening of the new documentary "Wildlife of the Oldman River Valley" on Thursday January 18, 2018 starting at 7pm.

‘Wildlife of the Oldman River Valley’ is a full length wildlife documentary that was shot in the Oldman River valley by local wildlife photographer and filmmaker Rick Andrews. Capturing the area’s wildlife in each of the four seasons, this film also includes both underwater and night footage that collectively provide unique sights that even frequent visitors to this river valley may not have seen before.

Species such as Mule and White-tailed Deer, American Beavers, Coyotes, American White Pelicans, Great Blue Herons, nesting Great Horned Owlsand reptiles such as Prairie Rattlesnakes and Bull Snakes are all included, along with underwater sequences featuring Wandering Garter Snakes fishing and Western Painted Turtles swimming. 

The film is 43 minutes in length and shot entirely within the City of Lethbridge corporate boundaries in high definition (HD).

Be sure to check out Rick Andrew's website to get inspired for this wonderful film premiere:
http://www.rickandrewsphotography.com/ 

Avoid disappointment, reserve your seat for a $5 donation by calling 403-320-3064 - only 85 seats available! Donations support nature interpretation in Lethbridge.

 

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Wildlife of the Oldman River Valley
Jan
10
7:00 PM19:00

Wildlife of the Oldman River Valley

Members of Lethbridge Naturalists' Society and the Friends of Helen Schuler Nature Centre Society are proud to host a screening of the new documentary "Wildlife of the Oldman River Valley" on Wednesday January 10, 2018 starting at 7pm.

This full length wildlife documentary was shot in the Oldman River valley by local wildlife photographer and filmmaker Rick Andrews. Capturing the areas wildlife in each of the four seasons, this film also includes both underwater and night footage that collectively provide unique sights that even frequent visitors to this river valley may not have seen before.

The film was shot in high definition over four seasons in various locations within the City of Lethbridge.  

Film length: 43 minutes

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Christmas Bird Count (Lethbridge)
Dec
17
8:00 AM08:00

Christmas Bird Count (Lethbridge)

Are you interested in participating?

This year Lethbridge Christmas Bird Count will take place on Sunday, December 17, 2017.

More information can be found on the Audubon or Bird Studies Canada websites or you can contact the Lethbridge CBC Compiler Ken Orich at korich@telusplanet.net or call him at (403) 381-2351.

Please note, other Bird Counts in Southern Alberta:

  • Waterton - December 15, 2017 - Contact: Dianne Pachal 403-859-5133
  • Milk River - December 30, 2017 - contact: Ken Orich 403-381-2351
  • Taber - TBA - contact Lloyd Bennett 403-223-0456 
  • Pincher Creek - TBA
  • Crowsnest Pass - TBA 
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Winter Birds with Lloyd Bennett
Dec
14
7:00 PM19:00

Winter Birds with Lloyd Bennett

Join Lloyd Bennett on Thursday December 14 to learn about Southern Alberta's Winter Birds!  This program will help build your confidence in preparation of the Christmas Bird Count (taking place on Sunday December 17, 2017 in Lethbridge).  Enjoy wonderful photography and great commentary by Lloyd Bennett, long-time area naturalist.

Winter Birds takes place at the Helen Schuler Nature Centre's community room starting at 7pm on Thursday December 14.

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Chinook Country - A Continental Convergence of Cottonwoods
Nov
8
7:00 PM19:00

Chinook Country - A Continental Convergence of Cottonwoods

Join Dr. Stewart Rood as we explore the unique cottonwood forest system found in Lethbridge's river valley! 

About Dr. Stewart Rood

Following training at the universities of Alberta, Calgary and Toronto, and fellowships in Bristol, UK, and Tromso, Norway, Stewart Rood has been a faculty member at the University of Lethbridge for three decades, and has been a Killam Research Fellow and the Board of Governors Research Chair in Environmental Science.  His studies investigate the impacts of river damming, flow regulation and climate change on river ecosystems and floodplain forests, with an emphasis on conservation and restoration of riparian cottonwoods.  He has served as an environmental consultant to agencies across western North America that build and operate dams, working towards developing river regimes that promote socioeconomic prosperity and environmental sustainability.

Please note:

  • Annual General Meeting will take place from 7:00-7:30pm 
  • Guest speaker will begin at 7:30pm sharp 
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Annual General Meeting
Oct
11
7:00 PM19:00

Annual General Meeting

The Board of Directors of the Lethbridge Naturalists' Society invite you to join us for our Annual General Meeting of Members to be held on Wednesday October 11, 2017 starting at 7:00 PM. The meeting will be held at the Helen Schuler Nature Centre community room, located in the Lethbridge river valley at the north end of Indian Battle Road South.

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Field Trip - Pavan Park Nature Walk
May
25
7:00 PM19:00

Field Trip - Pavan Park Nature Walk

Easy walking. Focus will be birds. Spring migration will be well advanced. Some resident species in the cottonwood forest will be proclaiming territories.

Meet in the Pavan Park parking lot adjacent to the south side of the John Martin picnic facility 7:00 pm. Duration – 2 hours.

Participants in LNS outings (except Species Counts) will be asked to sign a Waiver and Release Form before taking part in the scheduled event(s). One signed form will cover the whole 2017 field trip season. Please contact the trip leader by 8:00 p.m. of the day before day trips so the leader will know you are coming. Always wear suitable footwear and clothing. For day trips, bring your own lunch and adequate liquids to prevent dehydration, sunscreen, insect repellent and rain gear. Car pooling will be encouraged for out-of-town trips.

Leader – Graeme Greenlee 403-328-8977.

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Field Trip - Six Mile Coulee Nature Walk
May
18
7:00 PM19:00

Field Trip - Six Mile Coulee Nature Walk

Easy to moderate walking. Focus will be flowers and birds. This evening walk will take us down (and back up) the open grassy coulees to the cottonwood forest and river.

Directions to meeting place – turn south at traffic light on Scenic Drive & 20th Street South, proceed south on Tudor Crescent 2 blocks to Tudor Blvd, turn right (west). The road angles back north and dead ends at a turn-around parking area. Meet here 7:00 pm. Duration – 2.5 hours.

Participants in LNS outings (except Species Counts) will be asked to sign a Waiver and Release Form before taking part in the scheduled event(s). One signed form will cover the whole 2017 field trip season. Please contact the trip leader by 8:00 p.m. of the day before day trips so the leader will know you are coming. Always wear suitable footwear and clothing. For day trips, bring your own lunch and adequate liquids to prevent dehydration, sunscreen, insect repellent and rain gear. Car pooling will be encouraged for out-of-town trips.

Leader – Graeme Greenlee 403-328-8977.

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Field Trip - Great Blue Herons
Apr
20
6:30 PM18:30

Field Trip - Great Blue Herons

See a Great Blue Heron nesting colony, and other wetland birds at the farm of Ron & Lorrraine Russell.

Participants in LNS outings (except Species Counts) will be asked to sign a Waiver and Release Form before taking part in the scheduled event(s). One signed form will cover the whole 2017 field trip season. Please contact the trip leader by 8:00 p.m. of the day before day trips so the leader will know you are coming. Always wear suitable footwear and clothing. For day trips, bring your own lunch and adequate liquids to prevent dehydration, sunscreen, insect repellent and rain gear. Car pooling will be encouraged for out-of-town trips.

Meet in northwest corner of south side Fairway Plaza Safeway parking lot 6:30 pm on Thursday April 20

For more information, contact:

Leader Graeme Greenlee (Ph 403-328-8977).

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Ecosystem Management Presentations (Part II)
Apr
12
7:00 PM19:00

Ecosystem Management Presentations (Part II)

Students from the Lethbridge College Ecosystem Management class will be presenting on the following topics:

1) Michael Kelly – The Influence of Design on the Internal Temperatures of Bat Houses. This study seeks to determine how bat house design, specifically number and arrangement of chambers, influences internal temperatures of the houses. Three bat house designs are compared for temperature suitability.

2) Paden Lennie – Evaluating the Influence of Thaw Degree Days on Annual Raptor Productivity on the Hershel Island Yukon Territorial Park and the Implications for any Future Management Plans. Warming temperatures in the Arctic have led to some major changes affecting the timing of ecological processes. Using Hershel Island in the Yukon as the study site, this project addresses how these climate-related changes may be impacting raptor productivity.

3) Kate Kent – Correlation between Avian Point Counts and Monitoring Birds by Banding. The primary objective of this project is to compare two sampling methodologies and determine the correlation between avian point counts and Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (M.A.P.S.). The project hopes to find that point counts provide an effective method for determining numbers and variation in numbers of bird species in and area.

Everyone is welcome to attend LNS events!  Donations are gratefully accepted to support the Society's ongoing activities.  Please share this event with friends who may be interested in learning more about ecosystem management

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Ecosystem Management Presentations
Mar
8
7:00 PM19:00

Ecosystem Management Presentations

Students from the Lethbridge College Ecosystem Management class will be presenting on the following topics:

  1. Harvest Rates of Waterfowl, by Derek Hallgrimson. This project looks to determine if there is a distinct vulnerability to hunting mortality in hatch year birds, vs. after hatch year birds. Data on species, sex, and age are used in the analysis.
  2. The Effects of Shepherding on Mule Deer Populations in Waterton Lakes National Park, by Tara Evenson. Mule deer frequenting the Waterton Lakes town site have caused conflicts with people and pets, and may be luring predators into town. The practice of shepherding, disturbing animals’ sense of security so they avoid an area, has been used in Waterton and this project looks at whether this practice is an effective control tool.
  3. Estimating the Weight of Red Kale using Chlorophyll A & B, by Danielle Crawford. The current process to determine plant productivity is laborious, and results in destruction of samples. This study looks to use chlorophyll meters to develop a quick, non-destructive technique of plant productivity estimation.

 

Everyone is welcome to attend LNS events!  Donations are gratefully accepted to support the Society's ongoing activities.  Please share this event with friends who may be interested in learning more about ecosystem management.

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“A scientific investigation of chemicals from southern Alberta plant species” with Dr. Roy Golsteyn
Jan
11
7:00 PM19:00

“A scientific investigation of chemicals from southern Alberta plant species” with Dr. Roy Golsteyn

Even in the 21st century, we are only beginning to realize that plants from the Alberta prairies might contain chemicals of scientific or medical importance. Many of these plants will be familiar to the naturalists of Lethbridge and to members of local First Nations. The Natural Product Laboratory at the University of Lethbridge is discovering new information about the chemicals that are present in these hardy and beautiful prairie plants.

Join Associate Professor of Biology and Alberta Ingenuity Faculty member at the University of Lethbridge Dr. Roy Golsteyn for an intriguing look at some of the plants in Southern Alberta that have remarkable potential.

Wednesday January 11 at 7pm
in Helen Schuler Nature Centre Community Room
Everyone is welcome to attend, admission is free (by donation).

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Christmas Bird Count (Lethbridge)
Dec
18
8:30 AM08:30

Christmas Bird Count (Lethbridge)

Christmas Bird Count History

“Prior to the turn of the 20th century, people engaged in a holiday tradition known as the Christmas “Side Hunt”:  They would choose sides and go afield with their guns; whoever brought in the biggest pile of feathered (and furred) quarry won.

Conservation was in its beginning stages around that era, and many observers and scientists were becoming concerned about declining bird populations.  Beginning on Christmas Day 1900, ornithologist Frank M. Chapman, an early officer in the then nascent Audubon Society, proposed a new holiday tradition – a “Christmas Bird Census” – that would count birds during the holidays rather than hunt them.

So began the Christmas Bird Count.”

Source: https://www.audubon.org/conservation/science/christmas-bird-count

Did you know?

  • This year is the 117th annual Christmas Bird Count.
  • Christmas Bird Counts are conducted between December 14th and January 5, inclusive dates, each season.
  • Each count takes place in the same established 15-mile (24km) wide diameter circle every year.
  • Every CBC is done by willing and dedicated volunteers.
  • CBCs are a critical part of Citizen Science.
  • Data provided helps researchers, biologists and wildlife agencies to study the long-term health and status of bird populations across North America.
  • Lethbridge CBC averages 42 different species per count with 49 species counted in 2015.
  • 20,882 Canada Geese were counted in 2015.
  • Mallards, Pigeons, Magpies, Chickadees, Starlings, Bohemian Waxwings, House Finches and House Sparrows are some of the most frequent birds counted.

Are you interested in participating?

This year Lethbridge Christmas Bird Count will take place on Sunday, December 18th.

More information can be found on the Audubon or Bird Studies Canada websites or you can contact the Lethbridge CBC Compiler Ken Orich at korich@telusplanet.net or call him at (403) 381-2351.

 

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Winter Birds with Lloyd Bennett
Dec
14
7:00 PM19:00

Winter Birds with Lloyd Bennett

Join Lloyd Bennett on Wednesday December 14 to learn about Southern Alberta's Winter Birds!  This program will help build your confidence in preparation of the Christmas Bird Count (taking place on Sunday December 18 in Lethbridge).  Enjoy wonderful photography and great commentary by Lloyd Bennett, long-time area naturalist.

Winter Birds takes place at the Helen Schuler Nature Centre's community room starting at 7pm on Wednesday December 14.

 

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"Stumps, Sawdust, Sediment: A Legacy of Logging in the Headwaters" with Lorne Fitch
Nov
9
7:00 PM19:00

"Stumps, Sawdust, Sediment: A Legacy of Logging in the Headwaters" with Lorne Fitch

Our ability to extract wealth from our forests, especially along the eastern slopes, moves faster than our understanding of the vital connections within them, and certainly our ability and will to effectively restore watershed function after logging.
 
Connecting the dots between logging and other forest values is what we should do; the problem is many cannot, will not, see the dots, let alone connect them in any meaningful sense. We do not sustain the forest, the forest sustains us. And a forest is more than the trees; it is a watershed.
 
Fish, native fish, are the gold seal of water quality and are a metric of the health of watersheds. So it follows, as the watershed goes, so do the fish; if the fish are going, something must be wrong with our forest management. A perspective on fish, native fish, might help answer the question – what’s all the fuss about land uses, especially logging?

Join local biologist and provincial riparian specialist Lorne Fitch for a better understanding of the impacts of disturbance in the eastern slopes:

Wednesday November 9 at 7pm
in Helen Schuler Nature Centre Community Room
Everyone is welcome to attend, admission is free (by donation).

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Annual Snow Goose Chase Field Trip
Nov
5
9:30 AM09:30

Annual Snow Goose Chase Field Trip

  • Fairmont Blvd S Lethbridge, AB, T1K 6T9 Canada (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join birders, outdoor enthusiasts, and other naturalists for a tour of Southern Alberta lakes to view part of the annual snow goose migration.  Expect an enjoyable day and (hopefully) an incredible amount of snow geese making their way south!  Saturday November 5th

To join this field trip:

  • meet at 9:30am at the South-side Fairway Plaza Safeway parking lot (NW corner / carpooling may be available); OR
  • meet at the viewing blind on the North side of Stirling Lake at 10:00am


Please note: waivers must be signed to attend with the LNS.

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Annual General Meeting
Oct
12
7:00 PM19:00

Annual General Meeting

The Board of Directors of the Lethbridge Naturalists Society invite you to join us for our Annual General Meeting of Members to be held on Wednesday October 12, 2016 starting at 7:00 PM. The meeting will be held at the Helen Schuler Nature Centre community room, located in the Lethbridge river valley at the north end of Indian Battle Road South.

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Field Trip - Wild Rose Conservation Site with Lee Moltzahn
Jun
18
8:30 AM08:30

Field Trip - Wild Rose Conservation Site with Lee Moltzahn

To celebrate the season and Canada’s Garden Day, the Lethbridge and District Horticultural Society is sponsoring a tour of the Wild Rose Conservation Site, an area of native grass and flowers on the Milk River Ridge south of Spring Coulee. This is the peek time to see the beauty of our wildflowers.  We can admire them in their natural environment, and consider the possibility of growing them in our own gardens.  MULTISAR rangeland agrologist and plant expert Lee Moltzahn is our guide. 

As we will be walking over uneven ground and some hillsides, participants must have good mobility. Bring a bag lunch, water, sunscreen, bug repellent and your camera.  If you are a bird watcher, bring your binoculars, too.  Plan for a three-hour walk and to be back in Lethbridge by 2:00 p.m. Our meeting place will be the northwest corner of the parking lot at the Safeway store at Fairway Plaza (Highways #4 and #5.)  The car pool will leave at 8:30 a.m. sharp, so please be there in time to sign the required Waiver and Release Form. 

PLEASE NOTE: Our guide has requested a limited number of participants, so pre-register ASAP with Penny at 403 380 3809 or p.dodd@telus.net.

 

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Waterton Wild with Jacinthe Lavoie and Ian Wilson
Jun
8
7:00 PM19:00

Waterton Wild with Jacinthe Lavoie and Ian Wilson

Enjoy a prelude to summer and a photographic tour of a special place, with a multimedia presentation featuring the wild creatures, wildflowers, and majestic scenery of Waterton Park, from bears to beargrass, birds to butterflies, and open meadows to mountain panoramas. Presented by Ian Wilson and Jacinthe Lavoie, authors of Waterton Wild and Wildflowers of Waterton Park. 

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